SocialFish Predictions for 2012

Written by Maddie Grant, CAE on . Posted in Social CRM for Associations, Social Media

Share
Wednesday, December 21, 2011 by Maddie Grant

Our 12 predictions for 2012 are actually not so much predictions, but social media trends that we’re seeing through all of the work we’re doing with organizations around social media management.

Associations will:

1. continue the hiring trend, adding more headcount for social media management and community management.

2. start to figure out mobile, by asking the right questions.

3. find the ROI of social media, through aligning social data with membership management.

4. expand the social layer around their events and conferences

5. continue to incorporate more user-generated social activities like tweetups and unsessions

6. continue to ignore geolocation, which may or may not be dead in the water

7. decide whether Google+ is worth paying attention to.

8. do more great work on their social media policies

9. experiment more and more with social learning and participatory learning

10. start building their social CRM practices

11. build with more internal collaboration through technology

12. Humanize.

The industry’s social media work is maturing.  We’re excited to be part of it.  Happy Holidays from the SocialFish!

This is a guest blog by Maddie Grant and Lindy Dreyer, SocialFish, part of a series of predictions for 2012.

 

Comments for SocialFish Predictions for 2012

Share

ROI and Social CRM Use Case 7: Member Services

Written by Maddie Grant, CAE on . Posted in Social CRM for Associations

Share
Monday, December 19, 2011 by Maddie Grant
Our [SocialFish] definition of Social CRM is “the discipline of applying social media to membership management”, and the 12 use cases in our white paper, ROI and the Impact of Social CRM, show this in action.  Here’s the 7th of a series of blog posts for Avectra on the use cases – including four completely new ones – and we want to hear from you if these are possible for YOUR association.  In ALL cases, you should be building your community on social media sites before you even think about ROI.

NEW USE CASE

Monitoring social conversations for actionable improvements to member services

[Possible Now]
An association has experienced rapid growth among professionals under 40. The average age of members inside the volunteer structure–including the board and various committees–is 55. Lately, staff members have been wondering if the board is truly representing the membership. The Social CRM team turns to the web. When they join, new members are asked to list their LinkedIn profile, their Twitter ID, and their blog URL. The Social CRM team follows and monitors all of these sites, along with Google Alerts, for member feedback about the organization. Twice per month, the Social CRM team assembles all of the posts from members into a single executive summary for the association leadership. The feedback confirms what the staff suspected–that the association website, which the board felt was adequate, needs an immediate redesign to meet the expectations of new members.

The recipe:
  • Your goal – to not just meet but exceed member needs and expectations.
  • ROI = higher retention rates, sales, new members
  • Level – Basic
  • Tools – Social Media Monitoring, AMS
  • Low hanging fruit – mining existing conversations on the social web

We’re calling this use case “basic” because monitoring the social web for brand mentions is the most elementary of social media activities.  But “listening” must have strategic purpose.  What if your members are asking for specific improvements?  Are you able to collect that qualitative data, track sentiment (positive, negative, neutral) and whether it changes over time, and take action on the basis of what you find?

 

Comments for ROI and Social CRM Use Case 7: Member Services

Share

Thoughts on IBM’s Social Business Predictions for 2012

Written by Sterling Raphael on . Posted in Social CRM for Associations

Share
Friday, December 16, 2011 by Sterling Raphael
Well, it’s that time of the year again!  Time to dust off our crystal ball in the hope of taking a peak around the corner to 2012.   Along with the normal resolutions pertaining to personal commitments/lifestyle changes, I think it’s important we take a look at a few of the Social Business Predictions for 2012. 

For sure, the takeaway for businesses for 2012 in terms of social CRM is that our business plans must surround customer participation or involvement.  Social CRM is quickly on the rise and yes, we have to echo that sticky word, engagement!  Businesses can no long operate “as usual” centered solely on ‘customer management.’   In his article, IBM’s Social Business Predictions for 2012, Alistair Rennie, GM of Social Business, clearly substantiates this as he writes, “Just like the Internet opened up a world of new opportunities, the rise of social business is creating new jobs. With the adoption of these new internal and external social business tools comes the increasing need for staff to manage the new processes and communities, to measure their effectiveness, and to educate and enable the workforce to participate. Corporations are quickly realizing they must create new roles like the community manager to take on these new responsibilities. In today’s highly connected global business environment, the way people communicate, find and share information and work together has changed dramatically.”

We all understand that communities are always centered on ‘people’ with mutual interests. Even though the way we do business in the coming year will continue to evolve, the way we communicate is where the revolution should take place. There’s no doubt that the explosion of Social CRM has risen to the level of a business necessity, and as Gartner projects “overall spending on CRM software will surpass $12 billion in 2012, and the social CRM will include abruptly 8% of all CRM spending in 2012, an increase from 4% in 2010.”

Appropriately, the prediction from Alistair Rennie –  Community Manager…Watch for this role to take off in 2012, with organizations of all shapes and sizes, in a variety of industries calling on experts to help to build, maintain, and activate members in an online location around common interests and topics.  The key?   Ability to be transparent, drive sharing among members, and listening and shaping conversations”

And then we have P. Greenblog who wrote a very timely article (back in 2009!), when evaluating an engaged and responsive audience, the truths of which are still pertinent today: 

“Social CRM acknowledges that company equity is created or destroyed by processes outside of the traditional corporate boundaries…The takeaway is MIB
  • Manage what you can,
  • Influence what you cannot directly manage and 
  • Balance what you can neither manage nor influence. 
These three need to be core corporate competences.”  I expect that this trend will remain for the foreseeable future.

According to some of the stats from a research report sponsored by Avectra, also included in our blueprint for 2012, consumers expect social interaction on the web. 65% of organizations believe enterprise 2.0 collaboration will increase productivity.
  • Business managers and IT managers are beginning to work more closely together to co-own and co-sponsor emergent collaboration initiatives. Forty-six percent (46%) of respondents state that their organization’s business and IT departments were jointly responsible for sponsoring the effort.
  • Forty-three percent (43%) of companies cite financial gain (cost savings and revenue generated) from implementing enterprise collaboration tools.
Findings reveal how emergent collaboration is increasingly a necessity for businesses to stay competitive in a global economy.  To view and download the State of Enterprise 2.0 Collaboration, visit the Chess Media Group Resources page. Registration is required.

Let your customers be your guide to success!

How do you foresee consumer behavior evolving in the coming months?

 

Comments for Thoughts on IBM’s Social Business Predictions for 2012

Share

ROI and Social CRM Use Case 6: Retention

Written by Maddie Grant, CAE on . Posted in Social CRM for Associations

Share
Tuesday, December 13, 2011 by Maddie Grant
 Our [SocialFish] definition of Social CRM is “the discipline of applying social media to membership management”, and the 12 use cases in our white paper, ROI and the Impact of Social CRM, show this in action.  Here’s the 6th of a series of blog posts for Avectra on the use cases – including four completely new ones – and we want to hear from you if these are possible for YOUR association.  In ALL cases, you should be building your community on social media sites before you even think about ROI.

NEW USE CASE

Better retention rates through social profile mapping

Not so distant future, with the help of new technology]
Before embarking on the annual renewal campaign, the membership department checks the email marketing database and finds more than 214 email addresses had a hard bounce, meaning they are no longer valid. Since the majority of those email addresses are work emails, it’s likely that those 214 people have changed jobs. Over the course of the last year, the community manager has been busy with social profile mapping, so more than half of the 214 missing members have their LinkedIn or Facebook profile tied to the association’s AMS. Using the association’s social media management system, the community manager sends a private message to each of the 116 people to either ask about their new job and update their email address, or to offer them help finding a new position through the association job board and discounted membership dues.

The recipe:
  • Your goal – to maintain contact with members at risk of dropping due to job change.
  • ROI = higher retention rates
  • Level – Intermediate
  • Tools – Social Media Management System, AMS, Social Discovery
  • Low hanging fruit – existing social data captured in the AMS

The true test of this use case is about using social media to build relationships with members over the long term, which will minimize events like job changes where they might otherwise be lost.  You’re probably seeing some of this happen organically – a few people staying connected to the association online even if they drop membership – but the key here is to be proactive about staying in touch, knowing that they will always take their Facebook or LinkedIn or Twitter profiles with them no matter what job changes they undergo.  This can be relatively easy to do by keeping social profiles of your members in your AMS.

 

Comments for ROI and Social CRM Use Case 6: Retention

Share

Archives